How To Reverse Stepper Motor Direction

In most stepper motor driver circuits, the H-bridge has four inputs and two outputs. The H-bridge circuit has the ability to switch and control the voltage of a DC motor by sending signals to each wire. One input is common ground and three wires go to each side of the H-bridge. Each side connects from the top or bottom of the motor. Each output is a voltage that switches and changes directions for the motor.

Here, you will learn how to reverse direction on a standard h-bridge by swapping connections on one side of the motor. Changing up these connections will allow you to send signals in either direction with ease! To understand how an H-bridge works, let’s first look at what it’s made up of: An operational amplifier (op amp), which is an analog device that supplies gain; A pair of field effect transistors (FETs); A capacitor; And resistors.

H-bridge Basics

An H-bridge circuit is a circuit that allows the voltage to flow in one direction only. It is made up of 4 FETs, resistors, and capacitors. A FET is a Field Effect Transistor. It is a type of transistor that is used for switching high voltage DC. In an H-bridge circuit, two FETs are used for each direction. The current flows from the positive voltage source, through the FET, and then back to the negative voltage source. The voltage source sends current to the FET by connecting it to the positive voltage source. The FET has two sides: the “source” and the “drain”. The current flows through the FET from the source to the drain. The source is connected to the positive voltage source and the drain is connected to the positive voltage source.

How to wire an H-bridge

You can wire an H-bridge in two ways, series and parallel. In a series configuration, you wire one FET per leg: the “source” terminal connects to the positive voltage supply, the “drain” terminal connects to the motor, and the “gate” terminal connects to a microcontroller’s trigger pin. The parallel-wired configuration connects each leg to the same points as the series configuration: the “source” terminal connects to the positive voltage supply, the “drain” terminal connects to the motor, and the “gate” terminal connects to a microcontroller’s trigger pin. But note that in a parallel configuration, the current through each leg is reduced by the same amount as the current through the other legs.

Find the ground wire and mark it

Once your H-bridge circuit has been wired, use an ohmmeter to find the ground wire. It is connected to the negative voltage source and usually has a black or blue wire. Once you find the ground wire, mark it with a piece of tape or a marker to make it easier to identify. This will help you find your ground wire when you’re ready to send signals in the opposite direction using the H-bridge.

Swapping wires on one side of the motor

The goal of this step is to swap the connections on one side of the motor. The diagram below shows the connections of a four-terminal motor, which is the most common type. First, disconnect the motor from the H-bridge circuit and the power supply. Next, remove the motor from the mounting brackets and pull off the anti-backlash nut. Then, remove the wire connectors from the terminals by hand. After the connections have been removed, you can swap the wires on one side of the motor by following these steps.

Full H-bridge wiring diagram

The diagram above shows how to wire an H-bridge in a full configuration. It shows a two-terminal motor, which is less common. The two-terminal configuration is useful if you want to manually control the speed of the motor. You can do this by varying the voltage and current sent to the motor. When you wire an H-bridge in a full configuration, you can also manually control the speed of the motor. However, you will need an external potentiometer. If you have a two-terminal motor, you will need to use the same wiring diagram as shown in the previous section.

Final thoughts

When you’re using an H-bridge, it’s important to remember that the motor terminals are usually labeled “A” and “B”. Although the order of the terminals doesn’t matter, the direction of the current flow does. You can tell which direction the current is flowing by looking at the connections on each terminal. If the connections on one terminal point in one direction, the connections on the other terminal point in the opposite direction. When wiring an H-bridge, it’s common to misread the terminal labels. If this happens, just remember that the ground wire is always constant.

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